About

Hudani Immigration Law/About

About

My Story | Zafira Hudani

 

My parents were refugees from Africa, my father having lived under the oppressive rule of Idi Amin. When things got worse in the early 1970s they emigrated to Canada, and I was born in Windsor, Ontario.

I crossed the Atlantic myself to attend The University of Manchester in England. Graduating with a Bachelor of Laws with Honors, I continued my education by earning a Masters in International Business Law from American University’s Washington College of Law in Washington, DC.

After passing the New York bar exam and receiving my license to practice law there, my training, interests and background led to the natural decision to focus on immigration law.

Since moving to Atlanta, I interned for one Atlanta immigration attorney, and trained with another. I volunteered at local non-profits, helping immigrants prepare their green card renewals, changes of status, and citizenship applications.

I am proud to be a member of the American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA), which is a national association of more than 15,000 attorneys and law professors who practice and teach immigration law.

I decided to open my own private immigration law practice in Atlanta because I saw it as one of the United States’ important cultural crossroads. People from all over the world come to this city and its surrounding areas for the opportunity of a better life.

However, for many, navigating the immigration system in the U.S. has been a challenging, confusing and often frustrating endeavor. I have chosen to help these people, and make their official transition through legal means my mission as an attorney.

Each day I put my skills to work, aiding people in obtaining their green cards or other status in order to get a foothold in their new home country. And I always admire their courage, for the leap of faith they took. It was the same leap of faith my own parents took all those years ago, so that I might have a better life.

My Story | Zafira Hudani

 

My parents were refugees from Africa, my father having lived under the oppressive rule of Idi Amin. When things got worse in the early 1970s they emigrated to Canada, and I was born in Windsor, Ontario.

I crossed the Atlantic myself to attend The University of Manchester in England. Graduating with a Bachelor of Laws with Honors, I continued my education by earning a Masters in International Business Law from American University’s Washington College of Law in Washington, DC.

After passing the New York bar exam and receiving my license to practice law there, my training, interests and background led to the natural decision to focus on immigration law.

Since moving to Atlanta, I interned for one Atlanta immigration attorney, and trained with another. I volunteered at local non-profits, helping immigrants prepare their green card renewals, changes of status, and citizenship applications.

I am proud to be a member of the American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA), which is a national association of more than 15,000 attorneys and law professors who practice and teach immigration law.

I decided to open my own private immigration law practice in Atlanta because I saw it as one of the United States’ important cultural crossroads. People from all over the world come to this city and its surrounding areas for the opportunity of a better life.

However, for many, navigating the immigration system in the U.S. has been a challenging, confusing and often frustrating endeavor. I have chosen to help these people, and make their official transition through legal means my mission as an attorney.

Each day I put my skills to work, aiding people in obtaining their green cards or other status in order to get a foothold in their new home country. And I always admire their courage, for the leap of faith they took. It was the same leap of faith my own parents took all those years ago, so that I might have a better life.

I’ve always believed that such rich diversity makes our country a more interesting, productive, and colorful place.  After all, we are, at our core, a nation of immigrants.

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